Ezekiel 8.15-17 and Acts 4.12 – Idolatry and salvation
Posted: 16 October 2012 in Acts, Ezekiel

“Then said he unto me, Hast thou seen this, O son of man? turn thee yet again, and thou shalt see greater abominations than these. And he brought me into the inner court of the Lord’s house, and, behold, at the door of the temple of the Lord, between the porch and the altar, were about five and twenty men, with their backs toward the temple of the Lord, and their faces toward the east; and they worshipped the sun toward the east. Then he said unto me, Hast thou seen this, O son of man? Is it a light thing to the house of Judah that they commit the abominations which they commit here? for they have filled the land with violence, and have returned to provoke me to anger: and, lo, they put the branch to their nose.”

“Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved.”

It is difficult to conceive of a more gross insult to the Creator than for his sentient creatures, who are under an obligation to worship him (who alone is worthy of worship), to worship his creation instead.

It is sometimes said that eternal punishment is unjust, but what presumption is it for us to decide what God should be allowed to do? There is nothing finite about the sin which impugns the infinite majesty of the Most High God, and all sin does do that. It would be tempting to say that nothing is less forgivable, were it not for the fact that our merciful God has made available a means of salvation in Christ, which alone can save us from the punishment which otherwise awaits. To question God’s justice and righteousness is a means only to condemnation. If we are arrogant (and sinful) enough to reject both God’s judgment that all men are worthy of an eternity spent in hell, and to reject the only means of avoiding that condemnation, we will most assuredly deserve the fate which awaits us.

There certainly needs to be a return to the seriousness which takes the Bible at its word, and doesn’t try to accomodate it to the spirit of the age by trying to maintain that people have been mistranslating, and misunderstanding it, for 2,000 years. God is not a twenty first century liberal, or a twenty first century conservative, for that matter. He is the God who has made his will known once for all, and for all ages to come: Including our own, if we would but listen.

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